Yoga

Our aim is to offer sessions from the
best teachers, teaching a broad range
of truly authentic styles of yoga in a
great environment; so you could find
a class suited to you and so that yoga
could and would be for everyone –
regardless of age, size, gender, fitness,
diet and lifestyle.

 

Our main principle is to honour the tradition of yoga
and to create a sense of entering a sacred space.

We wanted to dispel the illusion about who can practice
yoga because it is truly for everyone – hence, everyone is welcome at Spirit Space. 

Flow yoga

Lecturer
Markéta Sulejmani

Flow yoga is based on rhythm. The word flow means "movement aligned with breath, which rhythmically builds on itself". Yoga in this style means that you will smoothly perform one asana after another in the rhythm of breath in and breath out. ... This is a dynamic and physically demanding form of exercise, often called Dynamic Yoga.

 

Yin yoga

Lecturer
Kateřina Dymáková

Yin yoga is a slow-paced style of yoga with postures, or asanas, that are held for longer periods of time—for beginners, it may range from 45 seconds to two minutes; more advanced practitioners may stay in one asana for five minutes or more.

Mysore

Lecturer

Lessons of morning dynamic yoga will wake you up and get your day started. We will greet the sun and the new challenges that lie ahead of us. Lessons are conducted in the vinyasa style with the use of full breathing and fluid transition to individual positions. Let’s wake up together, stretch, build strength and draw shared energy for the whole day.

Core + HIIT workout

Lecturer
Coach Poby

Pranayama

Lecturer
Jana Mikšíčková

Prāṇāyāma means control (“ayāma”) of life force (“prāṇa”). It is an ancient yoga technique in which prana is controlled by means of breathing exercises. Pranayama is good both for physical and mental health and for achieving a state of meditation. Pranayama has countless benefits: 
● extension of lifespan, which is proportionate to the tempo of our breathing
● increased oxygen absorption (increased lung function)
● control of emotions and thoughts (mental stability, clear mind, resistance to stress)
● improved concentration, memory and willpower
● clear and relaxed respiratory tract
● reduction of high blood pressure
● assistance with psychosomatic illnesses such as insomnia, depression, etc.
● relief from stress, anxiety, nervousness, headaches and fatigue
● strengthened immune system and improved digestion ● assistance with detoxification
● increased energy and muscle relaxation
● feeling of wellbeing, relaxation and happiness :-) 

Yoga for moms with guardianship

Lecturer

Vinyasa Yoga

Lecturer
Kateřina Dymáková

Vinyasa, also called flow because of the smooth way that the poses run together, is one of the most popular contemporary styles of yoga. It's a broad classification that encompasses many different types of yoga, including Ashtanga and power yoga.

In contemporary yoga parlance, vinyasa stands in opposition to hatha. Hatha classes tend to focus on one pose at a time with rest in between. In contrast, flow classes string poses together to make a sequence. The sequence may be fixed, as in Ashtanga in which the poses are always done in the same order, but most of the time vinyasa teachers have the discretion to arrange the progression of poses in their own ways.

Prana vashya

Lecturer
Jana Mikšíčková

Prana vashya means control (“vashya”) of life force (“prana”). It is intended to bring a bit of pranayama (control of prana through the practice of breathing exercises) into the practice of asanas. Slow controlled breathing lends rhythm to the movements that follow breaths.

Through breathing control, prana vashya keeps the focus on the asanas without allowing the mind to wander. The use of holding one’s breath during certain movements has a strong positive impact on the health of the body, development of physical endurance and mental resilience. These advanced abilities can be transferred from the yoga mat to life. The main benefit is calm and a clear and stable mind (thanks to breathing control), which influences the way a person reacts in life.

“If we can control our breathing on the yoga mat, then we can have control over our lives” is what prana vashya means. “Controlling our emotional responses to the challenges that life brings us,” as its founder, Vinay Kumar of the city of Mysore in Southern India, said. This firmly set sequence of positions is as demanding as we make it – we appropriately adapt it for complete beginners and we take advanced practitioners to a higher level.

Led Ashtanga yoga

Lecturer
Denisa Baumgartner

Ashtanga yoga is a system of yoga transmitted to the modern world by Sri K. Pattabhi Jois (1915-2009). This method of yoga involves synchronizing the breath with a progressive series of postures—a process producing intense internal heat and a profuse, purifying sweat that detoxifies muscles and organs. The result is improved circulation, a light and strong body, and a calm mind.

Led Ashtanga yoga with meditation

Lecturer
Eva Staníková

Ashtanga yoga, sometimes referred to as Ashtanga Vinyasa yoga, is a style of yoga that was developed by Sri K. Pattabhi Jois and T. Krishnamacharya in the 20th century. They claimed it originated from a system of Hatha yoga described in the ancient text, the "Yoga Korunta." Used in this context, the term, Ashtanga yoga, refers to this particular style of yoga.

Ashtanga yoga is a dynamic, flowing style that connects the movement of the body with the breath. The method stresses the importance of daily practice of a set series of movements. There are six series of Ashtanga yoga sequences, which the student progresses through at their own pace.

We finish each class with 20 minuts of meditaiton.

Hatha yoga

Lecturer

Hatha yoga is known as the yoga for the physical body. In Sanskrit, “Ha” represents sun and “tha” represents moon,

This alludes to the opposites in our lives, such as yin and yang, light and darkness, hard and soft, vigorous and gentle.

Hatha yoga is about finding balance. Through working with the physical body, releasing tensions and traumas stored in the body, you create space in yourself and, through that space and balance, the opportunity for spiritual growth. 

Noon Hatha yoga with Markéta

Lecturer
Markéta Sulejmani

Hatha yoga is known as the yoga for the physical body. In Sanskrit, “Ha” represents sun and “tha” represents moon,

This alludes to the opposites in our lives, such as yin and yang, light and darkness, hard and soft, vigorous and gentle.

Hatha yoga is about finding balance. Through working with the physical body, releasing tensions and traumas stored in the body, you create space in yourself and, through that space and balance, the opportunity for spiritual growth. 

Yoga for runners

Lecturer
Markéta Sulejmani

Do you run several times a week or only occasionally? Do you alternate between various surfaces or do you always run on the same hard surface? Do your muscles ache? Do you feel tension? Do your joints ache? Do you have the feeling that you run out of energy at the wrong time? Do you reach a state where you lose your breath? Or do you run and you lack nothing and you want only to pleasantly stretch your body?

Then this yoga lesson is just for you…yoga works as supplemental compensatory exercise and thus prevents unwanted injuries. Yoga offers exercising without impact. Targeted movement with maximum relaxation of the muscles that we do not need for holding individual positions. I will teach you asanas that focus not only on deep stretching of muscles, but also on strengthening them.

What benefits will it have for you? Balance, breathing, stretching, relief and revitalization, compensation of running motion, calming of the mind, learning to be in the present moment and focus on breathing. 

Pregnancy Yoga

Lecturer
Adéla Bukovská

Yoga lessons for pregnant women are appropriate during pregnancy from the very beginning until the due date. During lessons, appropriate positions are selected that stretch, strengthen and relax. We also work with full yoga breathing, which leads each of the asanas, and we focus on relaxation and full relief of tension in the body and mind until the end of the lesson. Regular practice of yoga for pregnant women can improve the overall course of pregnancy, help with back pain, strengthen muscles, teach correct breathing and provide relaxation.